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. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. for each of us, there are days that are turning points. a day that changes our personal life, or a day that changes the nation. sometimes, very rarely, it's one and the same day. just such a day happened to me on wednesday, august 28th, 1963. i was 29 years old, the deputy director of the peace corps, with offices one block from the white house and a short walk from the lincoln memorial. that morning, largely on impulse, inspired by a friend, i joined the quarter of a million americans, people of every age and color, who had come for the march on washington. the event is now most famous for martin luther king, jr.'s "i have a cream "dream" speech, but like many of the others there, i was first transfixed by one of the other speakers, the youngest on the platform. >> brother john lewis. >> his name was john lewis. he had just been named head of sncc, the student nonviol
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about 600 people, black and white, many young people, some people who had just left church, decided to march from
standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> bob filner has resigned at mayor of san diego. he spent his last two months fighting a growing list have sexual harassment allegations. the san diego city council accepted his resignation this afternoon. he will officially step down august 30. he said goodbye to san diego, and apologized for letting the city down. >> obviously this is not a happy time for any of us, not for the city of san diego, not for those who represent and for my own part in causing all this, i offer deep apology certainly to all the citizens of san diego and through you to the citizens that you represent. the city should not have been put through this, and my own personal failures were responsible, and i apologize to the city. >> stephanie stanton joins us live from san diego. he apologized, but he didn't admit bob filner did r
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
of providing care to everything in america, not only will you not get care tomorrow, we'll take the dollars you use to get care today, and the supreme court said that was an outrageous use of federal power. seems like there's lots of examples in the history, and in our present of using the tax code to treat some people in some states differently than we do people in other state, and to use the affordable care act as a hammer, not an approach, but the stick. did you consider those things -- do you agree with my analysis of those two circumstances as they exist today, and did you consider those in the analysis that you performed? congressman, yes, we are aware of the provisions that you -- >> the stick approach opposed to the cater approach. >> as i said in the review of the legislative history, the floor debates, there's no evidence that there was any discussion of the carrot stick approach in connection with the premium tax credits. >> okay. but it is consistent with past irs practice to treat folks in some states differently than we treat folks in other states based on statute? only those with
that there were special events that san francisco will often do. whether it be the america's cup, sunday games, giants streets they will wake up for the car that is typically legally parked on this their street and find out they can't get it back but for a $500 fibromyalgiav. i protionx posed to the public if your community can help us figure out an app so if i provided my cell phone to city government, we can let you know if the street cleaning is going to happen tomorrow. we propose this had last year. mayor lee was supportive. we're still waiting for it to happen, idea number one. idea number two, my constituents ask me can you tell us where every single dollar in city government goes? whether it goes to an individual, nonprofit, someone providing goods and services in our city? last year i proposed an open budget application so that we could drill down and know where every single penny of city government is being spent. i want to thank our budget director who is here, our city controller. we are working on this, but we are still months away from getting the data that we need to provide thi
standards that are in little of informational texts. america is seeing two paths. choice or centralized education by the common core national standards. we have a choice to make. are we going to be a self- governing society or are a -- or society governed by despotism. a portion of one of the many education related events during c-span cost -- c-span's town hall program. we invite you to join the conversation. it starts tonight, 7:30 p.m. eastern time >> tonight on "first ladies." sofrances cleveland is popular. people are imitating her hairstyle. of her for piece themselves. we have always hurt as if we if we owned the first lady peered pictures of the first lady lady became extremely popular. you could purchase your own picture to have in your home. she is used in campaigns. we also have ms. cleveland running for first lady. >> the encore presentation of "first ladies" continues tonight at 9:00 eastern leading up to our live event at 11:00 this morning with the help secretary, we will hear about health care from vic morris, the former linton white house adviser. he speaks for about 25
, and the schools, no account teachers, and let's bring in teach for america clubs, open up charter schools in the district, and that's the model, the idea that's been propagated for the last decade plus under republican administration and a democratic administration. it is just the latest in a series of silver bullets overredded up, and you can just change the structure and everything else changes, but i think what union city teaches is -- or reminds us that -- is that there are a handful of time-tested, well-proven, well-established game changing strategies the school district can be done, and i'll say a word about that in a minute. why write about it? people forgot or took it for granted. it is almost like platitude, and any incompetenter with -- educator with a pulse will nod their head and say, sure. the trick is actually going from saying, yeah, that's a great idea to making it happen. in union city, you start with amazing preschool systems, and i know you are here someplace or another. where are you, suzie? [applause] i spent a fair amount of time in your class, and i walked in there
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
that attracted the president to want to go? >> it was a world there. -- fair, it was a celebration of america's place in the new world. the presidency was very surprising in many ways. in fact, he was the president who took the country to the world stage. the spanish-american war and turned america into a republican into an empire. at the end of his life in the last speech he gave, in effect he talks in ways that years later we can all appreciate about opening america to the world. >> we were looking at our posting and everybody is asking about what is known of ida mckinley, her ill health. here she is traveling with the president. what did the country think of the president to know about her? >> it is an interesting dichotomy. this is the pattern of her life. she had been grossly miscast by history as this victorian invalid on the fainting couch. there were times when she was that way. she had chronic illnesses. one was seizure disorder, known as epilepsy. she had damage along her left leg which led to immobility. she also had a compromised immune system. she was susceptible to infections. t
.5 million this quarter. almost 50% of our business in north america is mobile. we're focused on migrating from being a daily deal e-mail business to being a true e-commerce marketplace where we now have over 54,000 deals live every day in north america. and we're focused on taking what's working in north america where we saw 23% growth in q1 accelerate to 30% in q2. and really give that to the rest of the world. we're by no means done. we've got a long way to go. >> now, you're alluding to the fact that though you have seen significant growth in the u.s., there is still significant weakness internationally. what's your plan to get the rest of the world on track? >> i mean, we saw some good improvement this quarter. europe shrank 8% year over year in q1. and that accelerated to 4% growth in q2. so that's pretty significant growth. we're now focused on taking the stuff that works. we know when we bring more deals to the market it has a huge effect. when we can get consumers to basically start with groupon when they want to buy anything anywhere, any time, we know that has a huge impact. and
between race and the criminal justice system. lawyer part of the moving america towards justice series. march onlso a special washington event. to haverivileged today a dynamic group of individuals who will guide our coverage around the complicated tough relationship between race and the criminal justice system. a briefrovide introduction for each panelist. they will then be allowed a short amount of time to present their area of expertise and focus and then we will open the floor after i have a series of brief questions to the panel. we will open the floor for your questions. i hope that you have gotten the cards and written your questions down. you will be holding them up so our people can collect them and bring them to me to read. before we get to the panel, it is a pleasure for me to introduce the president of the national bar association, patricia rosier. -- i just can't have her come up. she is the president of the national bar association, the nation's largest association of african american lawyers in justice. portionedicated a major of her life's work to the bar association. s
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
was a really good friend. next. all throughout high school we hung out. >> heroin's increasing toll on america. and later...? >> in three more years, star trek is going to be celebrating its golden anniversary.,, [ female announcer ] new nature valley soft-baked oatmeal squares. hearty oatmeal now softly baked with a drizzle of cinnamon. it's a brand-new take on a morning classic. soft-baked oatmeal squares. new from nature valley. ♪ you have to let me know [ female announcer ] when sweet and salty come together, the taste is irresistible. sweet and salty nut bars by nature valley. nature at its most delicious. >> osgood: no parents want to believe their child could be hooked on heroin. so it's always a shocking discovery when they find out. it does happen every day and sometimes in places where you would least expect it. our colleagues at "48 hours" have spent the last few months investigating heroin addiction in a small town in illinois. our cover story is reported now by maureen maher. >> it's thursday afternoon in the levy chicago suburb of naperville, illinois. >> i will be home later.
that was badly needed in america not only for those in attendance but those who could hear and see on television and to send a message to washington, to the state houses, to the local levels that the movement is still alive. and we have to believe that, and we have to act on it. i'm one of the old citizens of the time. i could not help but reflect on things such as the fact that we were not allowed -- people of color were not allowed on television shows. we did hold places in government. i used the theme that had such a negative connotation, stand your ground. i hope i got over to the crowd we need to seize that and use it as our own in a positive way. stand our ground for what we believe, for what we have worked and for what we have died for and move forward. >> it's a reclamation of that spiritual "we shall not be moved" that version of stand your ground. i love what you said about the young people. there was a group from howard university right there near where our msnbc stand was all day. i could sort of watch and see how they were responding. but it was also important what you just said abo
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
to be the least aggrieved black man in america to be palatable to the wider electorate and that's what he did in 2008. we're now in 2013. he's been elected twice. it's the 50th anniversary. i don't see how he can speak without dealing directly with the issue of race without going there today. and then doing something else. not only talking about the issues that we kind of know how to address and know how to solve, vote rights, for example, we see was happening, we know how to organize. we know how to fight that. we have the tools and the laws in place to fight that. there are other things that are more complicated and more difficult to work on. the patterns of residential segregation that have led to schools in many parts of the country being segregated now as they were in 1970s or 1960s. that sort of thing is much more diffuse, much more complicated and that's what i hope i hear more about today not just from the president, but from other speakers as well. >> chris, to you gene's points the question of segregation in american society would seem to be settled but it's not you look at the stat
. and so, after nine years of separation an arrival gate in america. pure joy. >> hi, daddy. christie maynard who heard their story stepped in to help the family. >> very pretty. >> reporter: she took her on a shopping trip on her first day in america. >> it is so cool. >> yeah, let's go. it is so overwhelming, it makes me feel complete. >> reporter: and she already has a big american dream. >> i want to be a doctor, like for women who is pregnant, and small kids. >> reporter: ast steory that red us, sometimes god smiles and those who lived through dark days in africa can find light in a country founded on hope. bob woodruff, abc news, new york. >> what a great way. >> love that story. >> what a great we to end our newscast. the family reunited after nine years. boy do they have stories to tell each other. >> what a wonderful young woman she is. >> she will be a doctor. >> bet you she will. >> i can't wait to see it happen. good for them. >> see you in a little bit. ♪ >>> this the new york city police department now has to be part of the solution because the judge has agreed with us
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
. those are twot key questions being asked in the wake of major developments on america's crime beat. >> reporter: attorney general eric holder unveiled sweeping new criminal justice reforms saying long prison terms for drug offenses are not making the u.s. safer. >> we need to ensure that incarceration is used to punish, to deter, and rehabilitate, but not really to warehouse and to forget. >> reporter: meantime, the federal judge delivered a significant ruling. saying a hard line approach in new york city, a policy, stop and frisk has violated the constitutional rights of minorities. it was a blow for mayor michael bloomberg with far reaching implications. >> if this decision were to stand it would turn those precedents on their head and make our city and in fact the whole country a more dangerous place. >> reporter: the judge appointed a federal monitor saying police discrimination against blacks and latinos was widespread. with hundreds of thousands of innocent people stopped over the last decade. violent crime is down in new york and across the country. but if these tough laws g
shouted back no america, america. i had thrown my passport at them i was born in washington d.c.. they would kick me in the stomach when i would get my breath back and as others join the firing squad i would say america, america. at some point they take the guns from our heads we believe because we were from the same country. they would have to pay a price for killing us that they would never have to pay for killing them. a red cross jeep pulled up and the driver of the red cross jeep picked up this old man who was in a sewer ditch next to us. every time the soldiers beat him he would put up his hands and a prayer sign and they would smash the buts of their rifles into his face. we drove off to a hospital and they stopped us to get away from us and we drove as a human mouse to the hospital. they hung off the top of the ge. at the hospital the doctors and nurses started to cry when they saw us. not because we were in worship and the people. that we were being dragged there. i think because of what we have represented. not just allen and i but i think americans. not just timor b
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
reporters discuss their book "whitey bulger: america's most wanted gangster and the man hunt that brought him to justice." , the trialgan -- began june 12, 2013. [applause] >> thank you for coming out on such a beautiful day. we don't get a lot of those here. i'm with the chicago tribune, write a business column with kevin and shelly murphy of the boston globe who are here not to do scouting on the chicago black hawks. [laughter] but to talk about their new book on whitey bulger, the boston mobster caught on the lamb after, what, 16 years, and first of all, let's get -- you guys have been boston journalists for quite a long time at this point. >> somebody said between us it's, like, what, 16 years? yeah, we've been chasing him combined total for 25 -- i mean, 25 each, so 50 between us. >> wow. i was reminded in the beginning, when i was a kid, my father was taking a friend of mine to go see butch cassidy and the sun dance kid. he said, you know, remember, whatever the movie makes of them, they are the bad guys, and the other thing that it reminded me of was the old line from mel brooke in
're black or white, latino, asian america or native american. it doesn't matter whether we're straight or gay, we're one people -- >> the actual anniversary is wednesday, that is when president obama will speak from the steps of the lincoln memorial along with former president bill clinton and jimmy carter. close tore home, hundreds of people marched in san jose, they walked about a mile to the county building shouting, slogans and drumming. there was one woman who marched in washington 50 years ago and sat in her view there has been significant progress that more needs to be done. still ahead this morning what san francisco has to do to live up to the i have a dream speech. >>> on the action san francisco may take against nevada for dumping mentally ill patients in california. surfers and swimmers banned because of a shark. >> the weather department much more tranquil we're looking for a pleasant area once we dispense look at the nation's midsection. they're heating up and they're cooling down, good forecast for you after a break. ,,,, bay area headlines... stins beach is re-opening t
"america's got talent" the little dog bailey and dance partner. they will be here live this morning. >>> we do begin this half hour with a close call in california. police say a situation there was milliseconds from tragedy when a scene being shot for a movie got too real. >> reporter: as linda bergsly approached a coffee shop she saw something that made her hair stand on end -- armed, masked men threatening people inside. >> there was a gun. >> reporter: she quickly called 911. >> one pulled the gun out of the pocket. >> reporter: police rushed to the scene, prepared for a potential gun battle. >> by all intents and purposes it was an armed robbery and cops responded as such. >> reporter: an audio device captured what happened next. >> what are you doing? we're shooting a short film. >> after they stripped him the gun, he saw the film crew. >> reporter: the gunman and supposed hostages were actors, shooting an independent film. >> they didn't pull permits and didn't notify the police department. do. of an important thing to >> reporter: but according to the glenn dora city website, the fi
. lots in california. >> happiest cities in america. >> on the west coast. i know green bay, wisconsin, made that list. >> it did. we were all surprised about hi. my name is cj. a few years ago, my father became seriously ill. i did what i could do before he passed, but it took its toll. i lost my job, my house. i'm getting back on my feet, but i don't know when there'll be food on the table. how'd i do, cj? we could be twins. well, cousins maybe. announcer: play a role in ending hunger. visit feedingamerica.org/hunger and find your local food bank. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- terror fears. new details about a threat that has forced the u.s. to close embassies overseas all week and strengthen security here at home. >> plot to kill. the ugly accusations and allegations against an attractive college co-ed. police and prosecutors say a 21-year-old student was out for some lethal revenge against two ex-boyfriends. >> getting bullish, not in spain but in the u.s. coming to the cities coast to coast. why the events are so controversial and why some people cannot wait to run for t
is america's biggest foreign policy head ache right now. president obama and his security team met yesterday to decide how to respond. >> abc's global affairs correspondent martha raddatz traveled to cairo for an exclusive interview with the man at center of the crisis there. >> he is one of the most powerful men in egypt right now, a civilian leader behind the military's brutal crackdown on its own people. >> no country will allow to have a paramilitary people taking to the streets, preventing simple inhabitants in the neighborhood not able to go out. >> reporter: they were killed for doing that. >> we didn't provoke it. we asked them to go freely. we started by throwing only tear gas and they answered back by firing. >> reporter: the result, more than 1,000 egyptians dead. most of them for protesting the military seizing power. you do not believe egyptian security forces used excessive force at all? >> i cannot say that all of the police are peaceful. of course, there are some exceptions. i cannot say 100%. but i am sure that by and large they try to abide. >> reporter: so no remorse for w
stains. ♪ >>> america just can't compete in this connected world without a super fast information highway. that's why the government has set aside billions to upgrade the nation's internet service. >> but abc's david kerley found $1 million wasted in a single closet in west virginia on the washington watch dog beat. [ modem handshaking ] >> reporter: speed, we crave it on the internet. a fast connection. we need it to remain competitive in a global economy says the president. >> to harness the full power of the internet. that means faster and more widely available broadband. >> reporter: the to spread broadband the government came up with $7 billion and thousands of communities have been hooked up. but take a look at this -- these boxes stacked up in a west virginia closet are blazing fast, high speed routers, you paid for them $20,000 each. they're unused. the state bought too many and the wrong ones. $1.25 million in this closet gathering dust for nearly three years now. enough for a year's pay for 30 teachers. that's not all. congressional investigators questioned other spendin
parties and a funeral, plus plenty of valet parking in america's gilded capitol. read the book and engage on our facebook page and twitter. "washington journal" continues. host: at the table now, michael steele, the former r.n.c. chairman from 200-2011, thank you for joining us. we've been talking about syria, do you see a division within the republican party on syria? guest: i don't think there's been a clear voice that's come out about what republicans say about this. certainly there is a union anymority about what we need to do next, which is definitely deal with the use of chemical weapons by the assad government. but i think a lot of republicans are waiting to see exactly where the president is going to go with the foreign policy. you have the secretary of state calling this a moral obscenity. so the tone and the rhetoric is there. the question is now what are the next steps? the president and his team have been very good, at least in this instance, of getting and keeping the congress informed, getting members of congress in on the conversation early enough, so that should some type
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
america. for the entire time there i tried to get bourbon i couldn't. this is back in '80s, early '90s. >> right. david: scotch is their main drink. i imagine the same is true for asia. have you changed that already? >> same thing with me. i started about 25 years ago. in my first trip to london you couldn't find a bottle of jack daniels in a pub. now we're one of the largest selling spirits in the u.k. it has been dramatic change over last 25 years. where i started we sold four million of cases of jack daniels. most of that was in the united states. mostly 95%. now we're selling over 11 million cases of sway jack daniels in 150 countries, black label is the high-end bourbon. >> old number 7 is our flagship brand with the black label on it. that is our other story for us we have a family of brands. gentleman jack, jack single barrel are more expensive. both growing double-digit growth. our rtd business, in cans and bottles is millions of cans and bottles around the world growing five or 6%. our newest family member, jack daniels, tennessee whiskey or tennessee honey is selling nearly 8
issues. >> this morning on "world news now" -- rich relief. the world meets america's newest millionaire. we have new details about who is taking home one of the jack pots from new jersey. also ahead. >> my main goal for this whole project is to find the real paul. >> the decade old mystery of a missing baby. why this man believed that little boy was him. in an abc news exclusive, barbara walters sits down with the man in the middle of the heartbreaking mix-up. >> then forget about laying on the beach. how about hovering high above it. the newest vacation sensation. it's friday, august 9th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now" with john muller and diana perez. >>> tgif. can i get a high five. >> yes. >> we feel brown today. i feel like we work for ups or something. >> just need our patches. couple of things to deliver. >> boxes. >> couple boxes. it is friday. perfect way to start friday. starting with a feel good story. >> let's get to it. feel belt irtter if it was me. learning details about one of the winning powerball tick tets. >> but by a group of vehicle workers an
's the chart. as josh brown pointed out this morning, for those who were -- thought this bet on america, on an american recovery was misguided -- >> or naive. >> slammed it in their face. stock's up 31% this year. >> to go back to the point as well, book value which buffett likes to use, up 2% for the quarter. in a period where travelers, some of the other big insurance competitors suffered because of their exposure to what was happening in the bond market. buffett what does he do? he buys companies. concentrated stakes in equities which did well in the second quarter and that helped outperform a the lot of his peers. >> buy a railroad, utility company in nevada hoping on recovery from recession there. big mac cr macro bets. >> tyson food, 69 cents, beat business 9 cents. revenue a beat. chicken and beef volume, up 4%, hard to do in this in economy. >> especially with beef prices the way they are. >> interesting you mention that. chicken feed costs up $105 million in the quart, less than 335 in the first half. the thinking is, they're looking at commodity costs coming down, even as pric
'll debate and let you decide whether it's fair. >>> hi, everyone. we're live from america's news headquarters. i'm jamie colby. we're waiting for president obama's arrival in orlando. this is video of the president and first lady departing andrews air force base. the commander in chief is set to speak at the opening session at the disabled veterans convention and address the consistent backlog of veteran disability claim. later they will travel to martha's vineyard for a nine-day vacation. the deadly search for a missing teenager turning to a rugged wilderness. investigators are now standing out near cascade, idaho, where suspected kidnapper and murder joe dimaggio is believe to be hiding. they believe he abducted hannah yanderson. last night, the sheriff officer confirmed her brother's remains were also found in the home. i'm jamie colby. i'll see you at 1:00 p.m. eastern right here on fox. have a great day. >> david: so much for lawmakers taking the same medicine they impose on the rest of us. under the healthcare law, congress and thousands of congressional staffer were going
the world attended it. it was really a time for america to shine and to show that it was coming into its own as a world power. guest: mrs. grant loved it. she bought two things for the white house from there -- one was a shield that showed characters from milton's "paradise lost." then she bought a more endearing piece -- she hated the old james monroe centerpiece with mirrors on it -- she bought a hiawatha centerpiece, which was about this big, and it shows a canoe in the middle and hiawatha lounging on a bearskin rug. that was the new centerpiece for the white house. she bought it there on exhibit. it is still in the silver closet at the white house. host: on twitter -- who were the first lady's staff at this point in the process? guest: there was no social secretary then. usually the ladies got together and filled out the blanks for invitations. it was president and mrs. grant and the honorable blank and blank. their friends would come over for tea party and they would fill out the blanks. she had mary mueller as the housekeeper. is that the one who traveled to europe with her? guest: i
is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. >>a. >> >> >> meteorologist: well, we're going to update quite a bit of weather around the united states as well as mexico. i want to take you to california. we're still looking at some intense rain towards the south. unfortunately, it's not getting over here towards the west where we need it, where the wildfires are burning, but for california, nevada, as well as parts of montana as well you're seeing quite a bit of rain, and flash flooding is going to be a major issue for y
boy. but anyway, this was actually -- you know, mika, you were probably too young, but america stopped, actually. >> absolutely. >> america stopped and it was -- there was something shocking about a man playing a woman in tennis. >> a man getting his butt kicked. >> well because -- >> yeah. >> joe -- >> paid off. by the way -- >> time to move on -- >> we should have seen this. >> the last gasp of the republican party, right? >> should have seen this a mile away. >> the republican party? >> they don't like women, right? >> it was rigs. >> the only guy -- the only way they could beat a man was if he threw the match, right? >> joe, you're missing a wild -- >> i'm hearing it, but, howard, proves once and for all, the hate mail on twitter today is a marxist because everything, absolutely everything, goes back to politics for marxists. all right. there we go. >> joe calls howard marksesist on -- >> don't -- marxist, everything goes back to politics. >> i don't know no. >> i'm not talking about your ideology but the tennis match and you bring it back to republicans. >> miley cyrus. >> come on
% of all children live in poverty. >> stephanie: in america. >> in america. >> stephanie: you say your wealth inequality statistics are staggering, and people just hear that, but i think they don't know what that means, but the word staggering, i think is dead on, don't you? >> yeah, i mean there's words in the industrialized nation, and it has gotten a lot worse, and what he used to pride ours on, what the american dream has always been, it's upward mobility that you can be born with nothing and then die a rich person. and the statistics now are that this really doesn't happen anymore. you get to be in the middle class the same way you get to be king, by virtue of birth. we just don't move anymore >> stephanie: and how do we resolve these numbers by kicking the downed to -- down-trodden. poor shaming is the justification that people are -- leave it to americans to kick people when they are down. and that's what they did again with the farm bill. >> they tell poor people to get a job. and they have a job, and they say they can't feed their family or pay their rent, and republicans say
, massachusetts. the town is number one on "money" magazine's new best small towns in america list for weathering the recession well and having a big lake and being close to both boston and providence. so close that you can commute to work in either city. it is also diverse. nine churches, seven synagogues and one of the largest mosques in new england. louisville, colorado, and vienna, virginia, round out the top three. >> bill: never heard of that city in massachusetts. nine churches in a town of 17,000? congregations are rather small, i would say because some people do not go to church at any rate. what we have -- very significant yesterday. there are two unrelated decisions regarding -- related to law enforcement that really were related. they weren't planned that way but they really do fit together and say something very important, i think, about law enforcement in this country. a lot of us have said for a long time that we went way overboard, you know. 10, 20 years ago. the last -- the previous generation about -- gotta be tough on crime. tough on law enforcement. crack down on crime. throw
intervention. it believes the rebels will not support america's interest if they were to come to power now. this came out to a letter that general dempsey sent. he said the military is clearly taking out the syrian air force and shifting the balance. michigan republican congressman justin amash held a town hall meeting recently in michigan. he touched on topics like health care and government surveillance. he offered an amendment that would bar the and as a from collecting phone and data records from citizens who are not subject of investigation. the amendment was opposed by speaker john boehner and the white house and ultimately defeated. his town hall back in michigan lasted about one hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> hello, everyone. ben, he is my chief of staff. he does not just work for me. he is primarily in our grand rapids office, and you can find that on my website, and we have a satellite office in battle creek, so if there is something you would like to schedule, you can contact our grand rapids office, and we will make sure we will have someone to meet with you as well. jordan
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